If you’ve been following the blog for a while, you’ll know how much we love turning things into planters. From tin can handbags to leftover fast-food containers we’ve made them all. We’ve even built ourselves one-of-a-kind concrete mushrooms with succulent tops and it’s those mushrooms that inspired this DIY idea. I’m calling it my “Not Mushroom” fairy planter since there’s literally not much room for plants in this one. 😉 So it’s important to pick a trailing or creeping plant that doesn’t have a deep or invasive root system.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

And since the only spot I had open in the garden is in partial shade, I chose Silver Falls to put in mine. I just love the way the pale silver-green leaves pop against the mossy background.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Unlike the succulent mushroom planters, this “Not mushroom” version is made from polystyrene that’s “dressed up” to look like concrete. And to make it extra special I turned that faux concrete mushroom stalk into a wee fairy abode.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Another thing we do a lot of here at A Crafty Mix.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Okay, before I show you how to make a “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter, be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram. And don’t forget to subscribe so you’ll never miss a post!

What you need

For the Not Mushroom Planter

The key to this fairy planter is a large polystyrene mushroom. I’ve added an affiliate link at the bottom of the post from Amazon, but I’m not sure if they’re the right size. I bought mine at a local craft store here in South Africa and it’s about 51 cm high (20″). The mushroom cap is 28 cm (11″) in diameter at the bottom and tapers up to 15 cm (6″) at the top.

What you need to make the "Not Mushroom" fairy planter

You’ll also need a suitable plant that will fit inside the polystyrene mushroom cap. Plants that thrive in hanging baskets are a good choice. For a flowery version of the “Not Mushroom” fairy planter think fuchsias, bacopas, and lobelias. It would look beautiful filled with strawberries too. To disguise the polystyrene and turn it into a planter I used:

  • Green and grey craft paint
  • Moss
  • Electrical pipe
  • Sharp craft knife
  • E6000 or other clear waterproof glue
  • Texture paste. We make our own texture paste, but the store-bought version will work too.

For the fairy house

  • Small stones or Quikcrete
  • Stirrers or popsicle sticks
  • Foil tray
  • Glue
  • Stain or craft paint
  • Beads
  • Twigs

How to make a “Not Mushroom” planter

This is not our first mushroom planter tutorial, but this one is much easier to make. So many people loved our succulent mushrooms but the whole thought of mixing concrete put them off so I had to find a way to recreate something similar, without the messy hassle. The trick lies in that polystyrene mushroom form. Look for a mushroom with a top or cap that’s large enough to fit a small creeping or trailing plant. Trim the top of the mushroom off with a sharp craft knife.

Remove the top of the mushroom cap and hollow out

Dig the craft knife downwards into the mushroom top and slice all the way around.

Remove the top of the mushroom cap and hollow out

Carefully hollow out the top until it fits a small plastic pot.

Test to see if a small planter fits

To make a drainage hole, take the PVC pipe and push it all the way down the mushroom stalk. Cut the pipe to size. You want a piece that’s at least 10 cm taller than your mushroom. Polystyrene mushrooms are really light and that extra bit of pipe will help stabilize the planter once it’s filled with greenery 😉

Make a drainage hole down the center of the mushroom stalk and insert the pvc pipe

Remove the pipe once it’s been cut. We’ll use it later when we plant the “Not Mushroom” fairy house.

Insert the pvc pipe to create drainage in the mushroom

Turning the polystyrene mushroom into a fairy house

Apply a layer of homemade texture paste all over the mushroom stalk and use this mossy mannequin tutorial to create a faux concrete look. Paint the cap of the mushroom green using craft paint. Wait for the texture paste to dry fully before drawing a sketch of where the fairy door and windows should go.

Draw a door and windows on the mushroom stalk and cut out with a craft knife

Use a sharp craft knife to cut around the outlines of your sketch.

Draw a door and windows on the mushroom stalk and cut out with a craft knife

Insert the craft knife under the cuts as shown below.

Draw a door and windows on the mushroom stalk and cut out with a craft knife

Carefully lift the cut portions away.

Draw a door and windows on the mushroom stalk and cut out with a craft knife

Do the same for the windows.

Draw a door and windows on the mushroom stalk and cut out with a craft knife

Use a piece of scrap paper and rub it over the cuts to create a template for the door and both windows. You need two door templates; one to make the stone cladding around the door and the other to make the actual door. Set one of the door templates aside.

Make a paper template of the door and windows

Label the templates and tape them onto a smooth work surface. I used a glass cutting board.

Make a paper template of the door and windows

Mix up a tiny batch of Quikcrete. I think I used about 1/2 cup of Quikcrete.

Mix up a small batch of Quikcrete or use leftover concrete mix to make stones

The mixture needs to be a little on the dry side. You want to be able to form a blob of concrete that holds its shape. Oh, and wear gloves. I always forget and then end up applying copious amounts of hand cream for weeks afterward.

Use left over concrete to make small blobs

Roll the blobs into small stone shapes and place them around the door and window paper templates.

Use left over concrete to make small blobs

Set the stone blobs to one side to cure. While you wait, grab a used foil container. Cut the container so it fits neatly inside the window holes you made earlier. 

Use the paper template as a guide to the windows

Glue on some twigs to create window panes.

Glue twigs on the aluminium windows

Grab a few wooden stirrers or ice cream sticks to make a fairy door. We’ve already shared a tutorial on how to use craft sticks to make fairy doors, so I won’t bore you with another one. Glue the fairy door and windows to the mushroom stalk. Once the concrete stones have cured fully, glue them all around the door and the windows.

Glue the concrete blob stones around the door and windows

Finishing off the Not Mushroom Fairy Planter

Almost done 😀 Apply lots of waterproof glue. I like using E6000. It’s extremely durable and dries clear.

Smear E6000 on the top of the mushroom

Glue moss down all over the mushroom top.

Add the moss and pat it down firmly into the glue

Once the glue dries, you can find a spot in the garden for the “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. Since polystyrene is quite light, it’s best to secure it in the ground by burying PVC pipe.

Dig a hole that's deep enough for the pvc tube and plant the fairy mushroom planter

Dig a small, deep hole and insert the pipe, before slipping the mushroom over the pipe.

Slide the mushroom planter onto the pvc pipe

Once the “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter is firmly in the ground, you can add your plants. If you just want a little greenery, then creeping Charlie, pothos, string of pearls, and Burro’s Tail are all good choices. I planted a Silver Nickel Vine (Dichondra argentea ‘Silver Falls’) in my “not mushroom” fairy planter. They’re drought and frost hardy and grow best in full sun. When planted in partial shade, her leaves will be a little greener and they won’t grow as vigorously. And best of all, she doesn’t mind if I forget to water her for a few days.

Add a beautiful Silver nickel vine to the "Not mushroom" fairy planter

Silver falls can be a vigorous grower in full sun and I’ll probably need to trim her at some stage, so those gorgeous tendrils don’t take over. But for now, she can just do her thing. I added a few more fairy plants around the planter to complete the picture.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Towards the back, there’s the Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium). She comes from the Iris family and isn’t technically a grass, but she does have the most beautiful teeny tiny blue, and purpleflowers.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Cold hardy and undemanding, she doesn’t mind the shade and should thrive in her new home.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Then there’s the dainty Blue Star Creeper (Pratia Pedunculata) that you may have seen in our fairy playground.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Isn’t she just lovely? One of my all-time favorite fairy plants.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

To finish off I pushed some pebbles into the ground to form a pathway that leads to the fairy door.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Not bad for a cheap polystyrene mushroom. What do you think? Would you add a “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter to your garden?

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

If you like the idea, don’t forget to pin it for later.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Sharing is caring.

We all need a little fun and magic in the garden, which is why we made this “Not Mushroom” fairy house planter. And while the mushroom looks like it was cast in concrete, it actually uses a large polystyrene form as a base. Come see how we made this one. #Gardendecor #Acraftymix #fairygarden

Oh and if you’re looking for some of the things we used, we’ve got you covered. Disclosure: Clicking on the links below, means we may receive a commission from Amazon. But don’t worry it won’t come out of your pocket, and it helps us come up with more amazing craft ideas to share with you 😉

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Or if you prefer to buy rather than DIY, then one of these beauties may appeal.

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And as always, wishing you a wonderful, crafty week filled with lots of love. Thank you for popping in for a visit.

Made with love by a Crafty Mix